Connect with us

Crime

Tampa Lawyer Made Porn in Prison

Polipace Staff

Published

on

A Tampa lawyer had sexual relations with a female inmate inside the Pinellas County Jail several times in a private room reserved for attorneys to meet with their clients, investigators said.

He is also accused of soliciting sex from another incarcerated woman, according to deputies, offering to put money in her commissary account and saying he was filming the acts for a pornographic video titled Girls in Jail.

Pinellas Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said Andrew B. Spark, 54, may have performed the same scheme with multiple women in county jails across the Tampa Bay region and Central Florida.

In Pinellas, the sheriff said, Spark lied and said he was representing the women to gain access to the room, which does not have recording equipment and only has a small window in the door.

“He duped the system because he came in there representing himself as a lawyer,” Gualtieri said at a news conference Monday. “There’s something that is sacrosanct about that lawyer-client relationship, and that’s why we give great consideration and, frankly, deference to it.”

The first woman, 28, met Spark when he paid her for sex after finding her prostitution ads online before she went to jail, the sheriff said. The lawyer met the second woman, 25, last year at a porn convention in Tampa, according to deputies.

He engaged in sexual acts with the 28-year-old, who is detained on drug charges, at least six times between June and December, investigators said. Spark would film the woman in the private room, the sheriff said, and started by asking her to narrate sexual fantasies. Spark would stand in front of the door, blocking the window while she performed a sex act, Gualtieri said.

Spark deposited $30 to $40 in the woman’s commissary account at a time.

 

Polipace.com is an independent political news site dedicated to exposing the truth.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Crime

Tekashi 6ix9ine Arrested by Feds for RICO

Polipace Staff

Published

on

Daniel Hernandez, the Brooklyn rapper known as Tekashi 6ix9ine, was arrested in New York City on federal crime charges last night. 6ix9ine’s ex-manager Shottie, real name Kifano Jordan, and their associates Faheem Walter (aka Crippy) and Jensel Butler (aka Ish) were also arrested. They all face racketeering and firearms charges. 6ix9ine said last week that he had fired Shottie and the rest of his management team.

The investigation that led to 6ix9ine’s arrest was conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s office with the NYPD, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and Homeland Security Investigations. Pitchfork has emailed a representative for 6ix9ine for comment.

Earlier this month, police apprehended Jordan in connection with an incident in which Walter, in his capacity as 6ix9ine’s bodyguard, was shot and later charged with gang assault.

Hernandez is currently on probation, stemming from an October 2015 guilty plea to the use of a child in a sexual performance. Sentencing in the case dragged on for years until, last month, a New York judge gave Hernandez four years of probation and required him to complete community service, refrain from gang affiliation, and avoid future arrests.

Daniel Hernandez also has a pending legal case in Texas. This past January, Hernandez allegedly choked a 16-year-old at the Galleria Mall in Houston, Texas. Hernandez and his security demanded that the teenager erase video footage of the incident from his phone, according to a police report. In May, he was charged with misdemeanor assault, and he was arrested on the Texas warrant in July.

Continue Reading

Crime

AG Whitaker Alleged to Have Served on Board of WPM

Polipace Staff

Published

on

The FBI is reportedly conducting a criminal investigation related to World Patent Marketing, a company that was shut down in 2017 after the Federal Trade Commission alleged that it operating “an invention-promotion scam” that tricked “thousands of consumers out of millions of dollars.”  According to recent reports, new acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker served on its advisory board.

Alleged WPM Conduct

In 2017, the Federal Trade Commission charged the operators of an invention-promotion scam, World Patent Marketing, with deceiving consumers and suppressing complaints about the company by using threats of criminal prosecution against dissatisfied customers.  At the FTC’s request, a federal court temporarily halted the Florida-based scheme and froze its assets pending litigation.

“This case is about protecting innovators, the engine of a thriving economy,” said then Acting FTC Chairman Maureen K. Ohlhausen.  “The defendants promised to promote people’s inventions and took thousands of dollars, but provided almost no service in return.  Then they added insult to injury by threatening people who complained.”

According to the FTC, consumers paid an individual and various corporate entities thousands of dollars to patent and market their inventions based on bogus “success stories” and testimonials promoted by the defendants.  But after they allegedly strung consumers along for months or even years, the defendants purportedly failed to deliver what they promised.  Instead, many customers allegedly ended up in debt or lost their life savings with nothing to show for it.

WPM Threats of Legal Action

The FTC also alleged that the defendants used various unfair tactics, including threats of legal action, to discourage consumers from publishing truthful or non-defamatory negative reviews about the defendants and their services.  According to FTC attorney Richard B. Newman, the agency reported that one customer who sought a refund and filed a complaint with the Better Business Bureau allegedly received a letter from the defendants’ lawyer.  According to the FTC, the letter stated that seeking a refund was extortion under Florida law and, “since you used email to make your threats, you would be subject to a federal extortion charge, which carries a term of imprisonment of up to two years and potential criminal fines.”

WPM Settlement Order

In 2018, the defendants agreed to a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission that bans them from the invention promotion business.  Under the settlement order, the defendants are also banned from  misrepresenting any good or service, and suppressing the availability of truthful negative comments or reviews by consumers.  They are also prohibited from profiting from consumers’ personal information collected as part of the challenged practices, and failing to dispose of it properly.

A $25,987,192 judgment was imposed, which was partially suspended when $78,670 in frozen funds were transferred to the Commission and the individual defendant Cooper paid $976,330.

Whitaker’s Alleged Involvement

According to media reports, court filings indicate that Whitaker received regular payments of $1,875 from the company while serving as a member of its advisory board.  It has also been reported that Whitaker sent a strongly worded email to a former customer in 2015 that had complained about the company.  Whitaker is not a named as a defendant in the case against the company.

In a statement, a Justice Department spokeswoman said, “Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker has said he was not aware of any fraudulent activity. Any stories suggesting otherwise are false.”  In fact,   FTC investigators did not obtain evidence or internal communications showing Whitaker knew about the company’s alleged bogus promises, according to those with firsthand knowledge of the matter.  The  receiver that oversaw the settlement confirmed, recently stating to The Washington Post that he has “no reason to believe that [Whitaker] knew of any of the wrongdoing.”

Richard B. Newman is an FTC defense lawyer at Hinch Newman.  Follow him on Twitter @ FTCLawDefense.

Attorney Advertising. These materials are provided for informational purposes only and are not to be considered legal advice, nor do they create a lawyer-client relationship. . Information on previous case results does not guarantee a similar future result. Hinch Newman LLP | 40 Wall St., 35thFloor, New York, NY 10005 | (212) 756-8777

Continue Reading

Crime

Bar Shooting Survivors Also Survived Vegas Route 91 Shooting

Polipace Staff

Published

on

One group of people at a Southern California bar where a gunman killed 12 people Wednesday night revealed it was their second narrow escape from a mass shooting. One man said he and others inside the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks also survived the shooting that killed 58 people and injured nearly 500 others at a country music concert in Las Vegas last October.

Nicholas Champion said he and many others in the bar were also at the Las Vegas Route 91 shooting.

“It’s the second time in about a year and a month that this has happened,” he said. “It’s a big thing for us. We’re all a big family and unfortunately this family got hit twice.”

More than 100 people were inside the bar during the shooting, including many college students who were there to celebrate “College Country Night.”

Police said they found the shooter dead inside, possibly from a self-inflicted wound. Ventura County Sheriff Geoff Dean told reporters early Thursday, “It’s a horrific scene in there. There’s blood everywhere.”

Among the victims is 29-year veteran deputy Ron Helus. Helus was among the first responders and was shot while entering the building where the shooting was taking place. He died at the hospital Thursday morning.

So far, there is no known motive for the attack.

(CBS NEWS)

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Recent Posts

Advertisement

What's Hot

Copyright © 2017 Pace Lattin Inc. powered by WordPress.