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You don’t have to like Trump to acknowledge the obvious

Bernard Goldberg

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The stock market is booming. Consumer confidence is soaring. The unemployment rate is falling. The economy is getting more robust every day. And President Donald Trump’s approval ratings have just hit a new low.

Congratulations, Trump. You are the president of a loyal base whose members adore you. The bad news, Mr. President, is that almost no one else does.

According to a new CNN poll, just 35 percent of Americans approve of the way the president is handling his job. Fifty-nine percent disapprove. The poll was taken before Congress passed the new tax law, so he may get a bump in the next round of polls. But it’s unlikely to be more than just a bump. The economy is already barreling ahead — and that hasn’t done much for his approval numbers.

So what’s going on? I’m not exactly going out on a limb to suggest his low approval numbers have a lot to do with his tweeting, his bluster and his pettiness. In short, a lot of Americans think he’s temperamentally unfit for office.

But you don’t have to admire this president, or even like him, to acknowledge the obvious: that more than a few journalists — like most other liberal Democrats — won’t rest until he’s out of office.

Trump thinks they just make stuff up to hurt him — or at least that’s what he says. Who knows if he actually believes it. His loyal base believes it and that may be all he needs to keep the “fake news” narrative going.

But here’s another explanation: Contrary to popular belief, journalists are only human and so, from time to time, they make mistakes.

But mistakes, if they’re really just that and not something more nefarious, should go in both directions. Funny, but when reporters make mistakes about this president, they all seem to go in just one direction — the anti-Trump direction.

If these were simply honest errors, some of them, just by chance, would help the president. But they don’t. So what should we make of it?

To say journalists have a liberal bias and detest this president isn’t exactly breaking news. When it comes to Donald Trump, a lot of journalists figure if the sun rose in the east today, he must have done something wrong and they’re going to prove it. So they let their journalistic instincts lapse; they let their guardrails down. Instead of being skeptics, they become gullible patsies, taking in all sorts of later discredited information peddled by anonymous sources — as long as it makes the president look bad.

They put out false information about collusion with the Russians, for example, because they want to believe that he conspired with his pal Vladimir Putin to rig the election. Collusion, after all, could lead to impeachment, the holy grail.

And if, heaven forbid, you criticize them for sloppiness or for going overboard, you’re accused to being a Trump sycophant who wants to put a stake through the heart of the First Amendment and democracy itself.

But how would these same journalists respond if it were Barack Obama or President Hillary Clinton who was under investigation by a special prosecutor who loaded up his team with Republican donors? How would they react if a lead FBI investigator texted his mistress that candidate Clinton “is a (expletive) idiot” and that they needed an “insurance policy” in case she somehow won the election?

We know how they’d react: They’d say the deck was stacked against the Democrat. They’d be outraged. And for good reason.

Yes, Donald Trump, with his egocentricities, his thin skin, his unnecessary quarrels with critics, and a lot more, gives the media plenty of ammunition to use against him. It’s as if he’s saying, “I just loaded the gun for you reporters who hate me; here it is; ready, aim, shoot me.”

Still, there are times when I wonder why he wastes so much time and energy beating up on the press when, thanks to their not so hidden contempt for him, they do such a good job beating up on themselves.

Distributed by Creators Syndicate

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Stormy Daniels Booking Strip Clubs Left and Right Since Trump Affair Revealed

Polipace Staff

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Stormy Daniels, the adult film actress who’s made headlines recently for an alleged affair with President Donald Trump years ago, has been performing in Strip Clubs around the United States.

Born Stephanie Clifford, Daniels became a national topic in January after the Wall Street Journal reported the actress received a payment from Michael Cohen, Trump’s personal lawyer, in 2016 to not discuss an alleged sexual encounter with Trump. Last week, Cohen told The New York Times he had paid Daniels $130,000 of his own money, but declined to say why.

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Did Trump Almost Lose The Nuclear Football?

Polipace Staff

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A new report has surfaced suggesting that White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and an unnamed member of the U.S. Secret Service got into a physical altercation with Chinese security personnel over the so-called “nuclear football,” a secure communications device inside an aluminum Zero Halliburton briefcase that enables the president of the United States to order a nuclear strike from virtually any location in a time of crisis. The Secret Service has denied that anyone got “tackled” during the alleged dispute, which may have occurred during President Donald Trump’s visit to China in 2017, but has not said outright that the incident did not happen at all.

On Feb. 18, 2018, Axios, citing five anonymous individuals, first reported about the events, which happened on Nov. 9, 2017, while Trump was in Beijing as part of a larger tour of countries in Asia. As the president and his entourage made to enter the Great Hall of the People, a large government building in Beijing that serves as a meeting place for gatherings of the Chinese Communist Party and other ceremonial affairs, such as state visits, a Chinese security officer apparently attempted to block the individual carrying the football from following them for unknown reasons. That U.S. military aide is supposed to be near the president at all times.

“We’re moving in,” Kelly, a retired U.S. Marine Corps general, reportedly said after hearing what was going on from where he was in an adjoining room and hurrying over to take charge of the situation. After arriving he pointedly told the aide and other members of Trump’s team to just keep walking into the hall.

In the ensuing kerfuffle, a member of the Chinese security detail assigned to the Americans apparently grabbed Kelly, who shoved him away. According to Axios, a nearby Secret Service agent then tackled the Chinese officer, likely in response to what they interpreted as a potential threat to a senior U.S. official.

Axios reported that the aide assigned to carry the football never lost control of the signature black briefcase during the scuffle and that clearer heads prevailed and calmed things down quickly. The unnamed individuals told the outlet that the Chinese apologized for the incident and both sides agreed not to make a public issue out of it, as well.

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Trump Proposes Budget Cuts to School Safety and Security Funding

Polipace Staff

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Even after this last school shooting, Trump can’t do anything right. The Trump administration’s budget unveiled earlier this week contains millions of dollars worth of CUTS to programs designed to keep schools safe and combat mental illness.

As Politico pointed out, the fiscal year 2019 budget would slash $25 million from a program that promotes school safety and a $400 million grant program that schools can use to deal with bullying and mental health issues.

The budget would also stop funding the School Emergency Response to Violence program (Project SERV), which received $1 million in federal money last year. Department of Education spokesperson Liz Hill told Politico the fund still has $5.2 million in its bank account, however, which she said would likely be enough to cover its needs through 2019.

Former Obama administration official Scott Sargrad, who worked at the Department of Education, told Politico the programs and grants proposed to be cut “are the kinds of things that can help students, staff and teachers respond and recover” after a school shooting such as the one that occurred in Florida on Wednesday.

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