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Trump Medical Records Show Worrisome Addiction to Drug

Kurt Eichenwald

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The following text was removed by Newsweek in a recent article about Trump — and “hidden” by their editors for some reason. We are publishing it in full, as we feel its information that is urgent for the public to know — and fair use.

According to medical records obtained by Newsweek but not published, Trump “metabolic imbalance” in 1982 by Dr. Joseph Greenberg, a Manhattan endocrinologist. Unfortunately, it is impossible to know the full meaning of Greenberg’s findings. “Metabolic imbalance” is a catch -all phrase for different conditions and, in itself, is equivalent of a diagnosis of “heart problem.” There are electrolyte insufficiencies, anaerobic imbalances, acid imbalances, and an assortment of related disorders that can have serious health consequences. According to a 2007 peer-reviewed study in the American Journal of Managed Care, patients with underlying mental illnesses have a higher incidence of this syndrome.

During the campaign, Trump released a letter from Dr. Harold Bornstein stating that he had been the then- candidate’s physician since 1980 and that there had been no significant medical problems throughout that time. The letter did not reveal that Trump had a second doctor during that time who had diagnosed him with a potentially serious condition.

The medical records and interviews with former officials with the Trump Organization reveal that Greenberg gave Trump a prescription for amphetamine derivatives in 1982 to treat his metabolic problem; the records show that Trump continued taking the drugs for a number of years and the former officials said that Trump stopped using them in 1990 at the latest.

The derivatives were diethylpropion, known under its brand name as tenuate dospan. These drugs are designed for short-term use; studies have concluded that patients can avoid developing a dependence on the drug if they take it for 25 weeks or less. But Trump continued downing the pills for years. According to two people -someone who said Trump would consider him a friend and a former Trump executive – the then-real estate developer boasted that the diethylpropion gave him enormous energy and helped him concentrate. A former Trump executive claimed to have picked up the medication while running errands for the boss. This person said the prescription, for 75 milligrams of diethylpropion a day, was filled at least for a time at a Duane Reade drugstore on 57th Street in Manhattan, a few blocks from Trump Tower. The executive said, like many celebrities, Trump used an alias for the prescription.

According to the Toxicology Data Network at the National Institutes of Health, diethylpropion has a high risk of dependency and chronic abuse- such as taking it for years – can cause delusions, paranoia, and hyperactivity. Studies in medical journals also report it can result in sleeplessness and impulse control problems, characteristics Trump demonstrated throughout the campaign and in the weeks since his inauguration

Hope Hicks, a White House spokeswoman, acknowledged that Trump used them as diet pills for a few days in the early 1980s. However, the medical records contradict the assertion of the length of time Trump used the drugs and photographs of Trump from 1982 show him to be quite slender. In a telephone call from Newsweek , Bornstein, Trump’s current doctor, said he could only answer questions if I could identify the location of Mount Sinai.

Assuming he was referring to the world- renowned hospital, I replied “Manhattan.” He said that was incorrect, and asked the question again.

I asked if he meant the actual Mount Sinai and he said he had not specified anything. I replied Mount Sinai was in Egypt, in the Sinai Peninsula. He said that was wrong and hung up. (While Mount Sinai is in Egypt, the location of the Mount Sinai described in the Bible as the location where God gave Moses the Ten Commandments, if that is what Bornstein meant, is the subject of debate among religious scholars.)

According to the former Trump executives and the person Trump considers a friend, his drug use was widely discussed within the company as symptoms of possible abuse began to emerge. Trump had always been aggressive and sometimes brutal in business as well as loose with the truth, but in the late 1980s, things had become much worse. While former employees said he had often been thoughtful and caring to his staff, he suddenly exhibited abusive behavior that at times seemed irrational. His self-aggrandizement grew to delusions of grandeur, his thin skin thinned more, his decisions grew more reckless. While he had always been a liar when it was convenient, he sputtered greater numbers of falsehoods at an alarming rate and seemed to believe them. When previously he would speak in sexist ways that were fairly typical in businesses during the early 1980s, toward the end of the decade he seemed to have no filter and openly said far more inappropriate things about women.

The worst impact of this recklessness may have been on his business; before the late 1980s, Trump usually focused on one major project at a time to ensure everything met his exacting standards. By the end of the decade, his reckless shopping spree was legion: he borrowed billions to open one Atlantic City casino after another, launching another one before any had turned a profit and ultimately creating a business model where he was competing with himself. As the scaffolding under his gaming business started collapsing, he borrowed even more money to buy his own airline. All of those late-1980s businesses flopped, sending Trump companies into multiple bankruptcies.

Kurt Eichenwald is a New York Times bestselling author of three books. He previously worked for twenty years at the Times as a investigative reporter, columnist and senior writer. He is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award for excellence in journalism and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2000 and 2002. His second book, The Informant, was called “one of the best nonfiction books of the decade” by The New York Times Book Review and made into a major motion picture starring Matt Damon. He lives in Dallas with his wife and three children.

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GOP

Tom Arnold Files Charges Against Mark Burnett

Polipace Staff

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Actor/comedian Tom Arnold and television producer Mark Burnett, known for reality TV shows like The Apprentice and The Voice, reportedly got into a physical altercation at a pre-Emmys party on Sunday night. Both the LAPD and Arnold’s lawyer, Marty Singer, confirmed the incident to The Hollywood Reporter.

Arnold tweeted about the incident around Midnight EST, alleging that “Burnett just went apeshit & choked me at this huge Emmy party then he ran away with his torn Pink shirt & missing gold chain.” He also stated that he’d called the police.

Around 9:45 am EST, Tom Arnold reported that he had filed charges against Mark Burnet “in West LAPD.”

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>Sitting in West LAPD filing charges against your best bud Apprentice Outtakes Mark Burnett who lost his mind, attacted &amp; chocked me last nite at Katzenberg’s Night Before The Emmy’s Party. Last fight I got into there was with Harvey Weinstein. Mark Burnett is scared:) <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/TrumpTapes?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>#TrumpTapes</a></p>&mdash; Tom Arnold (@TomArnold) <a href=”https://twitter.com/TomArnold/status/1041729746361475072?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>September 17, 2018</a></blockquote>
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In response, Burnett’s wife, Roma Downey (of Touched by an Angel fame) tweeted an image of her bruised hand, claiming it was injured during the confrontation. “Got this bruise tonight when Tom Arnold tried to ambush my husband Mark and me at a charity event,” she wrote. “Is your TV show worth it Tom? Please stop.”

Downey was referring to Arnold’s new show, “The Hunt For The Trump Tapes,” which premieres Tuesday on Viceland. The show follows Arnold’s attempts to find tapes that show Donald Trump expressing bigoted views on the set of “The Apprentice,” which Burnett produces.

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GOP

Manafort Will Lose Four Homes As Part of Guilty Plea

Polipace Staff

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Manafort, already convicted, will be pleading in Court Friday on more felony charges in order to avoid another very public trial. He seems to be willing to spend a great deal of money not to go to jail, and doesn’t trust he would be pardoned by Trump – and will be giving up four houses at a value of $46 million.

According to the agreement, he will be also losing his life insurance policy, which will be owned by the federal government. Not sure how that will work exactly, but maybe they assume Russia will “take him out” sooner than later?

A statement from the White House on Friday said the plea deal had “nothing to do with the president or his victorious 2016 presidential campaign”.

The former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has agreed to co-operate with an investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the US election as part of a plea deal.

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Trump

Crazy Las Vegas Professor Shoots Himself to Protest Trump

Polipace Staff

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A College of Southern Nevada professor faces felony gun charges for shooting himself in a campus bathroom in protest of President Donald Trump, according to his arrest report.

Sociology professor Mark Bird suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound in the arm the morning of Aug. 28.

According to Bird’s arrest report, a CSN employee told police she spotted Bird walking into a restroom. Shortly after, the employee heard a loud noise, and said she saw Bird walk out of the bathroom with blood coming from his arm.

While attempting to help Bird with his injury, the employee told police he said: “Against Trump.” He was also “rambling” and “excited about all that was going on in the country,” according to the witness.

A CSN student was also near the bathroom when the shooting happened. Bird told her “he’s protesting Trump and that he shot himself because of that,” according to the report.

Inside the bathroom, responding officers found a $100 bill taped to the mirror along with a note that read “for the janitor.”

According to on campus officials, Bird is still employed with the school. It is unclear if he will face disciplinary action.

Bird faces multiple charges including discharging a gun within a prohibited structure.

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