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Trump Medical Records Show Worrisome Addiction to Drug

Kurt Eichenwald

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The following text was removed by Newsweek in a recent article about Trump — and “hidden” by their editors for some reason. We are publishing it in full, as we feel its information that is urgent for the public to know — and fair use.

According to medical records obtained by Newsweek but not published, Trump “metabolic imbalance” in 1982 by Dr. Joseph Greenberg, a Manhattan endocrinologist. Unfortunately, it is impossible to know the full meaning of Greenberg’s findings. “Metabolic imbalance” is a catch -all phrase for different conditions and, in itself, is equivalent of a diagnosis of “heart problem.” There are electrolyte insufficiencies, anaerobic imbalances, acid imbalances, and an assortment of related disorders that can have serious health consequences. According to a 2007 peer-reviewed study in the American Journal of Managed Care, patients with underlying mental illnesses have a higher incidence of this syndrome.

During the campaign, Trump released a letter from Dr. Harold Bornstein stating that he had been the then- candidate’s physician since 1980 and that there had been no significant medical problems throughout that time. The letter did not reveal that Trump had a second doctor during that time who had diagnosed him with a potentially serious condition.

The medical records and interviews with former officials with the Trump Organization reveal that Greenberg gave Trump a prescription for amphetamine derivatives in 1982 to treat his metabolic problem; the records show that Trump continued taking the drugs for a number of years and the former officials said that Trump stopped using them in 1990 at the latest.

The derivatives were diethylpropion, known under its brand name as tenuate dospan. These drugs are designed for short-term use; studies have concluded that patients can avoid developing a dependence on the drug if they take it for 25 weeks or less. But Trump continued downing the pills for years. According to two people -someone who said Trump would consider him a friend and a former Trump executive – the then-real estate developer boasted that the diethylpropion gave him enormous energy and helped him concentrate. A former Trump executive claimed to have picked up the medication while running errands for the boss. This person said the prescription, for 75 milligrams of diethylpropion a day, was filled at least for a time at a Duane Reade drugstore on 57th Street in Manhattan, a few blocks from Trump Tower. The executive said, like many celebrities, Trump used an alias for the prescription.

According to the Toxicology Data Network at the National Institutes of Health, diethylpropion has a high risk of dependency and chronic abuse- such as taking it for years – can cause delusions, paranoia, and hyperactivity. Studies in medical journals also report it can result in sleeplessness and impulse control problems, characteristics Trump demonstrated throughout the campaign and in the weeks since his inauguration

Hope Hicks, a White House spokeswoman, acknowledged that Trump used them as diet pills for a few days in the early 1980s. However, the medical records contradict the assertion of the length of time Trump used the drugs and photographs of Trump from 1982 show him to be quite slender. In a telephone call from Newsweek , Bornstein, Trump’s current doctor, said he could only answer questions if I could identify the location of Mount Sinai.

Assuming he was referring to the world- renowned hospital, I replied “Manhattan.” He said that was incorrect, and asked the question again.

I asked if he meant the actual Mount Sinai and he said he had not specified anything. I replied Mount Sinai was in Egypt, in the Sinai Peninsula. He said that was wrong and hung up. (While Mount Sinai is in Egypt, the location of the Mount Sinai described in the Bible as the location where God gave Moses the Ten Commandments, if that is what Bornstein meant, is the subject of debate among religious scholars.)

According to the former Trump executives and the person Trump considers a friend, his drug use was widely discussed within the company as symptoms of possible abuse began to emerge. Trump had always been aggressive and sometimes brutal in business as well as loose with the truth, but in the late 1980s, things had become much worse. While former employees said he had often been thoughtful and caring to his staff, he suddenly exhibited abusive behavior that at times seemed irrational. His self-aggrandizement grew to delusions of grandeur, his thin skin thinned more, his decisions grew more reckless. While he had always been a liar when it was convenient, he sputtered greater numbers of falsehoods at an alarming rate and seemed to believe them. When previously he would speak in sexist ways that were fairly typical in businesses during the early 1980s, toward the end of the decade he seemed to have no filter and openly said far more inappropriate things about women.

The worst impact of this recklessness may have been on his business; before the late 1980s, Trump usually focused on one major project at a time to ensure everything met his exacting standards. By the end of the decade, his reckless shopping spree was legion: he borrowed billions to open one Atlantic City casino after another, launching another one before any had turned a profit and ultimately creating a business model where he was competing with himself. As the scaffolding under his gaming business started collapsing, he borrowed even more money to buy his own airline. All of those late-1980s businesses flopped, sending Trump companies into multiple bankruptcies.

Kurt Eichenwald is a New York Times bestselling author of three books. He previously worked for twenty years at the Times as a investigative reporter, columnist and senior writer. He is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award for excellence in journalism and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2000 and 2002. His second book, The Informant, was called “one of the best nonfiction books of the decade” by The New York Times Book Review and made into a major motion picture starring Matt Damon. He lives in Dallas with his wife and three children.

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GOP

Motel 6 Denies Couple Room Saying Puerto Rican Driver’s License isn’t U.S. ID

Polipace Staff

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A Puerto Rican couple visiting Sacramento County for their niece’s wedding said they were unable to check into a Rancho Cordova Motel 6 because the racist front desk clerk didn’t believe they had valid U.S. identification.

When Raul Villanueva presented his Puerto Rico driver’s license late Wednesday night, the clerk told him, “Oh, you need a license from the United States,” he said.

“I said, ‘This is a license from the United States, that’s Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is the United States.’ She said, ‘No, it isn’t,’” Villanueva recalled.

Villanueva needed his ID in order to verify his reservation. The woman working at the front desk then asked for his and his wife’s passports, which he reluctantly retrieved.

“She wouldn’t take the passports after all,” Villanueva said. “When I brought them she said, ‘No, I won’t take it. I won’t take that.’ So I said, ‘OK, then give me my money back.’”

The couple called Motel 6’s corporate office Thursday and talked to a representative. The person apologized for the mistake and admitted Puerto Rican identification is on their list of accepted IDs.

The couple ended up staying the night with a relative. They still haven’t received their money back from Motel 6.

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GOP

Border Patrol Turns Against Trump, Calls His Border Plan “Colossal waste.”

Polipace Staff

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The National Border Patrol Council seemingly has turned against Trump, calling Trump’s efforrts to send National Guard troops to the American-Mexican border, nothing but a huge “colossal waste of resources.”

“We have seen no benefit,” said Brandon Judd, president of the union that represents 15,000 agents, the National Border Patrol Council. “We generally support the administration, but we’re not going to be cheerleading when things are not going well,” Judd said.

Additionally, Agent Chris Cabrera, a spokesman for the union in the Rio Grande Valley, said troops are stationed far from the border, duplicating rather than lessening agents’ workload – and often getting in the way and sometimes getting lost.

He points out that most of the troops are just standing around, having to find “busy work.”

Texas Rep. Mary E. Gonzalez, who represents a district outside El Paso, agrees. “The National Guard deployment is a waste of finite resources, and is duplicative of existing border security efforts.”

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Trump

Trump Using Non-Secure Smart Phone Again, Relies on “Twitter Security” To Protect Him

Polipace Staff

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Our “stable genius” president Donald Trump’s impulsive use of his personal cellphone has always been a problem. This is partially because it symbolizes the total lack of control that Trump’s handlers have over him, because of the the enormous security risk it poses to America.

According to Politico, Trump uses two different phones that serve different purposes (one is only for calls and one is one is literally just for tweets).

The issue is that he has apparently gone five months without turning in his Twitter-enabled device to make sure it hasn’t been compromised or hacked—which, to be clear, would be bad. Politico was unsure how often the device he uses for calls, which the site likened to burners, is rotated out, but reports that it lacks “sophisticated security features designed to shield his communications.”

I had noticed last year at Earlier, “that Trump—at least sometimes—appears to leave location tagging on, pointing as evidence to a tweet, sent during the president’s recent international trip, which was tagged with the location “from Taormina, Italy.”

A senior staffer insisted to Politico that the phones Trump uses to call people are “seamlessly swapped out on a regular basis” and that Trump’s tweeting phone doesn’t need to be swapped out “because of the security controls of the Twitter phone and the Twitter account.”

What? They are relying on Twitter Security?

To compare, unlike Trump, former President Barack Obama did not use a phone with a camera or microphone and routinely submitted his phone to be checked for security breaches and whatnot every 30 days. But Trump is sooo not into that:

While aides have urged the president to swap out the Twitter phone on a monthly basis, Trump has resisted their entreaties, telling them it was “too inconvenient,” the same administration official said.

Yes, “too inconvenient” to get off the phone with the folks at Fox & Friends for maybe a couple hours? “Too inconvenient” despite a huge part of the Trump campaign relying on criticizing Hillary Clinton for using a private email server which was vulnerable to hacking? “Too inconvenient” despite the massive leaks that plague his White House? “Too inconvenient” despite chief of staff John Kelly’s own phone being compromised???!?!

It feels good to know that America’s downfall won’t come by means that are too fancy, but probably just because someone hacked our idiot president’s Twitter phone.

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