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Trump Medical Records Show Worrisome Addiction to Drug

Kurt Eichenwald

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The following text was removed by Newsweek in a recent article about Trump — and “hidden” by their editors for some reason. We are publishing it in full, as we feel its information that is urgent for the public to know — and fair use.

According to medical records obtained by Newsweek but not published, Trump “metabolic imbalance” in 1982 by Dr. Joseph Greenberg, a Manhattan endocrinologist. Unfortunately, it is impossible to know the full meaning of Greenberg’s findings. “Metabolic imbalance” is a catch -all phrase for different conditions and, in itself, is equivalent of a diagnosis of “heart problem.” There are electrolyte insufficiencies, anaerobic imbalances, acid imbalances, and an assortment of related disorders that can have serious health consequences. According to a 2007 peer-reviewed study in the American Journal of Managed Care, patients with underlying mental illnesses have a higher incidence of this syndrome.

During the campaign, Trump released a letter from Dr. Harold Bornstein stating that he had been the then- candidate’s physician since 1980 and that there had been no significant medical problems throughout that time. The letter did not reveal that Trump had a second doctor during that time who had diagnosed him with a potentially serious condition.

The medical records and interviews with former officials with the Trump Organization reveal that Greenberg gave Trump a prescription for amphetamine derivatives in 1982 to treat his metabolic problem; the records show that Trump continued taking the drugs for a number of years and the former officials said that Trump stopped using them in 1990 at the latest.

The derivatives were diethylpropion, known under its brand name as tenuate dospan. These drugs are designed for short-term use; studies have concluded that patients can avoid developing a dependence on the drug if they take it for 25 weeks or less. But Trump continued downing the pills for years. According to two people -someone who said Trump would consider him a friend and a former Trump executive – the then-real estate developer boasted that the diethylpropion gave him enormous energy and helped him concentrate. A former Trump executive claimed to have picked up the medication while running errands for the boss. This person said the prescription, for 75 milligrams of diethylpropion a day, was filled at least for a time at a Duane Reade drugstore on 57th Street in Manhattan, a few blocks from Trump Tower. The executive said, like many celebrities, Trump used an alias for the prescription.

According to the Toxicology Data Network at the National Institutes of Health, diethylpropion has a high risk of dependency and chronic abuse- such as taking it for years – can cause delusions, paranoia, and hyperactivity. Studies in medical journals also report it can result in sleeplessness and impulse control problems, characteristics Trump demonstrated throughout the campaign and in the weeks since his inauguration

Hope Hicks, a White House spokeswoman, acknowledged that Trump used them as diet pills for a few days in the early 1980s. However, the medical records contradict the assertion of the length of time Trump used the drugs and photographs of Trump from 1982 show him to be quite slender. In a telephone call from Newsweek , Bornstein, Trump’s current doctor, said he could only answer questions if I could identify the location of Mount Sinai.

Assuming he was referring to the world- renowned hospital, I replied “Manhattan.” He said that was incorrect, and asked the question again.

I asked if he meant the actual Mount Sinai and he said he had not specified anything. I replied Mount Sinai was in Egypt, in the Sinai Peninsula. He said that was wrong and hung up. (While Mount Sinai is in Egypt, the location of the Mount Sinai described in the Bible as the location where God gave Moses the Ten Commandments, if that is what Bornstein meant, is the subject of debate among religious scholars.)

According to the former Trump executives and the person Trump considers a friend, his drug use was widely discussed within the company as symptoms of possible abuse began to emerge. Trump had always been aggressive and sometimes brutal in business as well as loose with the truth, but in the late 1980s, things had become much worse. While former employees said he had often been thoughtful and caring to his staff, he suddenly exhibited abusive behavior that at times seemed irrational. His self-aggrandizement grew to delusions of grandeur, his thin skin thinned more, his decisions grew more reckless. While he had always been a liar when it was convenient, he sputtered greater numbers of falsehoods at an alarming rate and seemed to believe them. When previously he would speak in sexist ways that were fairly typical in businesses during the early 1980s, toward the end of the decade he seemed to have no filter and openly said far more inappropriate things about women.

The worst impact of this recklessness may have been on his business; before the late 1980s, Trump usually focused on one major project at a time to ensure everything met his exacting standards. By the end of the decade, his reckless shopping spree was legion: he borrowed billions to open one Atlantic City casino after another, launching another one before any had turned a profit and ultimately creating a business model where he was competing with himself. As the scaffolding under his gaming business started collapsing, he borrowed even more money to buy his own airline. All of those late-1980s businesses flopped, sending Trump companies into multiple bankruptcies.

Kurt Eichenwald is a New York Times bestselling author of three books. He previously worked for twenty years at the Times as a investigative reporter, columnist and senior writer. He is a two-time winner of the George Polk Award for excellence in journalism and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2000 and 2002. His second book, The Informant, was called “one of the best nonfiction books of the decade” by The New York Times Book Review and made into a major motion picture starring Matt Damon. He lives in Dallas with his wife and three children.

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Trump Admits He Killed Soleimani Because of Impeachment

Polipace Staff

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Not that it comes as a surprise, but Donald Trump is admitting to his comrades that he killed Iranian General Soleimani because he felt pressure from GOP colleagues that would decide his impeachment trial.

The administration has made a slapdash case for why it chose to assassinate Soleimani, but the main arguments have been that he was planning to attack Americans within days, and that the US would always respond forcefully after US citizens were killed. In December, an Iranian-backed militia killed an American contractor in Iraq.

But the Wall Street Journal on Thursday night included an eye-popping tidbit in its story about how Trump came to green-light the Soleimani operation: “Mr. Trump, after the strike, told associates he was under pressure to deal with Gen. Soleimani from GOP senators he views as important supporters in his coming impeachment trial in the Senate, associates said.”

In a lengthy piece detailing how the president’s top advisers coalesced behind the strike on Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the Journal noted that Trump said he felt “under pressure” to satisfy senators who were pushing for stronger US action against Soleimani and who will run defense for him on impeachment.

One of Trump’s most outspoken supporters, GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham was reportedly the only congressional lawmaker Trump briefed about his plan to assassinate Soleimani in the days leading up to the strike. 

In other words, the president felt the need to shore up support from some unnamed Republican lawmakers ahead of his imminent Senate impeachment trial.

It’s important to note that the above passage is just a short paragraph in a much longer piece about the inner workings of the Trump administration’s Soleimani discussions. And so far there is no other evidence to suggest that Trump didn’t give the order mainly to deter Iran from threatening Americans, although it’s unclear just how “imminent” that threat truly was.

But if Trump did consider impeachment when opting to kill the Iranian general — even if for a moment — then this is quite the scandal. It would mean the president didn’t just have the interests of the nation or the world in mind when bringing the US and Iran to the brink of war, but also his own personal political interests.

More reporting is needed to see just how much impeachment weighed on Trump’s mind when he gave the order. At a minimum, though, the Wall Street Journal’s reporting calls into question the legality of Trump’s Soleimani strike and the true intention behind it. And at worst, Trump’s decision to kill a foreign leader — as much as he may have deserved his fate — partly for political gain, is arguably impeachable on its own.

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What Drugs Are Donald Trump Taking and How Do They Affect Him?

Polipace Staff

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New questions about Trump’s mental and physical health have been coming up lately in the mainstream news. Donald Trump isn’t known for having the healthiest eating habits. While we might not know everything about his health, his physician Dr. Harold N. Bornstein has revealed enough to guess how healthy the president might — or might not — really be.

From heart attack prevention pills to hair growth meds, these are the drugs Trump depends on daily — and what they might tell us about his health.

The problem with these drugs is that three of them have serious side effects on the brain: including creating confusion, memory loss and even issues with rage and anger.

1. Rosuvastatin for high cholesterol
As its name implies, the drug Rosuvastatin belongs to a specific class of medications called statins, which lower total and LDL blood cholesterol. It’s likely Trump takes this medication to reduce his cholesterol and prevent possible complications that might result from living with high cholesterol levels in his blood because of his addiction to fast food, including eating McDonalds almost daily. Side effects may include constipation, headache, nausea, stomach pain, weakness, Selenium and Coenzyme Q deficiency and muscle aches and pains. Other side effects may include memory loss or confusion, kidney or liver problems or very rarely a deadly breakdown of muscle.

2. An antibiotic for rosacea
Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Some antibiotics (including tetracyclines) have both anti-inflammatory and antibiotic capacities. Low doses are normally used to provide more of an anti-inflammatory effect than an antibiotic (antibacterial) effect. Maximum anti-inflammatory effects appear to be achieved with doxycycline 40 mg capsules once daily. Tetracyclines (doxycycline and minocycline) have been the mainstay of treatment since the 1950s. Side effects of antibiotics may include vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, bloating and indigestion, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. Some antibiotics may cause dysfunction in the kidney and result in mineral imbalances. It may be necessary to monitor mineral levels if antibiotic therapy is prescribed long term.

3. Aspirin
Aspirin (81 mg) is widely used to reduce heart attack risk. But how does it work? Simply, aspirin interferes with the body’s blood-clotting action. It reduces the clumping action of platelets (blood-clotting cells), thus preventing a heart attack. Aspirin may cause minor side effects. Side effects may include acid or sour stomach, anxiety, belching, dizziness, dry mouth, hyperventilation, irritability, shaking, stomach discomfort, trouble sleeping, unusual drowsiness, tiredness, weakness or feeling sluggish.

4. Propecia is used for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. The condition is characterized by thinning of the hair on the scalp, which results in a receding hairline and/or balding on top of the head. The medication prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body. DHT may be responsible for the shrinking of the hair follicle and may inhibit a hormone called IGF-1 that helps with hair growth.

Side effects of Propecia may include hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat. The drug may also cause breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge and other breast changes, which may be signs of male breast cancer. Other side effects may include depression, impotence, loss of interest in sex, trouble having an orgasm, abnormal ejaculation, syncope, dizziness, weakness and headache.

Should note that he used to, and may still, be taking amphetamines, according to this report.

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Are Stimulant Drugs Messing Up Trump’s Mind and Speech? Doctor Claims He’s on Drugs

Polipace Staff

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I got a weird phone call after the Trump speech ended announcing the US Embasy Moving to Jerusalem, from a Psychiatrist in New York, who claimed that Donald Trump was taking Adderall and other psycho-stimulants. He didn’t want to have his name used, but he checked out as a Psychiatrist who had been working in Manhattan for over 20 years. He  said that Trump had been taking all types of stimulants for years and it was one of the reasons that Trump was, according to him, suffering from Dementia, as it causes permanent brain damage.

He also claims this is why Trump slurred, “God Blesshh the United Shtakes” in his speech.

Well, according to the doctor, he was a “friend of” one of the Doctors who prescribed drugs to Donald Trump until he started to run for President.

This isn’t the first time someone had made this accusation. According to SpyMagazine “Have you ever wondered why Donald Trump has acted so erratically at times, full of manic energy, paranoid, garrulous? Well, he was a patient of Dr. [Joseph] Greenberg’s from 1982 to 1985.”

Trump Drug Prescription 1982

Dr. Joseph Greenberg treated Trump from 1982 to 1985 for “metabolic imbalances‚” which is not a real medical disorder‚ but rather a fancy way of saying Trump wanted to burn fat.

The thing about Tenuate Dospan is that‚ due to its side effects‚ which include insomnia‚ confusion‚ and nervousness‚ it’s only supposed to be used for short time periods. So this makes what was written about Trump’s use of the drug seem alarming.

The diet drugs‚ which he took in pill form‚ not only curbed his appetite but gave him a feeling of euphoria and unlimited energy. The medical literature warned that some potentially dangerous side effects could result from long-term usage; they included anxiety‚ insomnia‚ and delusions of grandeur. According to several Trump Organization insiders‚ Donald exhibited all these ominous symptoms of diet drug abuse‚ and then some.

The brain damage caused by amphetamine use is still noticeable years later, say many experts.

In fact, users undergo similar brain chemical changes to patients suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease, stroke or brain tumors.

The Doctor said that it was “obvious” that Trump has been popping speed of some sort, and this would explain his weird speech patterns, and even the “crashes” he seems to have where he starts slurring his words suddenly and has severe dry mouth.

When you watch Trump speak to a crowd, and pay attention to his mannerisms and speech patterns, he certainly fits the bill for what you would expect from someone who is consuming pharmaceuticals.

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