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Trump’s Witch-Hunt

Michael Winship

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What a petty, venal, corrupt and foul thing it is. More media-generated homunculus than man, every day, Donald Trump behaves more and more like the cornered animal desperately trying to save itself by viciously biting in every direction, pulling out every nasty trick that has worked for him before. But now he gnashes his teeth on a global stage so vast that the pettiness of his vindictiveness is unconcealed, cast in a spotlight that diminishes every American.

With last week’s firing of Rex Tillerson and the dismissal of Andrew McCabe as deputy director of the FBI just hours before he was eligible for his pension after 21 years of service, the president once again demonstrated that as the Mueller investigation seems to get closer to a truth he does not want revealed, there is no bottom to the well of deception, posturing, vengefulness—and fear— that motivates his actions. Trump’s is the real witch-hunt.

Yes, it’s important that we soon see the inspector general’s report that was used to justify McCabe’s ouster, but to follow that character assassination Friday night with a Trump tweet celebrating the sacking as “a great day for Democracy” is a cruelly ironic subversion of our founding principles of liberty and justice.

Ironic, too, that this McCabe madness and that first of a new fusillade of dumb and desperate weekend tweets deliberately aimed at undermining Mueller’s probe should come down on the very day we marked the contributions of two politicians who dedicated their lives not to avarice and self-aggrandizement but to public service.

March 16 was the 50th anniversary of the day Robert F. Kennedy announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination. It was a controversial decision; as the Vietnam conflict raged on, Gene McCarthy had emerged as the leading antiwar Democrat challenging Lyndon Johnson’s re-election and Kennedy was accused of opportunism, of using McCarthy’s bid to test the waters for his own race.

Those old enough to recall 1968 remember it as a year like no other. The campaign for the White House was a cauldron of roiling drama and crisis. Kennedy was not running solely on his charisma and the family name; nor was he a one-issue candidate. He spoke out in opposition to the Vietnam War but consistently and passionately against poverty and social injustice as well. Here’s a little of what Kennedy said in a speech just two days after he declared he was running:

“… The gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials.

“It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.

“And it can tell us everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans.”

Try to imagine Donald Trump or his pals saying any of that and you’ll realize just how far our republic has fallen. Right after you recover from a fit of bitter laughter.

Friday also was the day we lost Rep. Louise Slaughter, the western New York congresswoman who was the oldest sitting member of the House. She served for nearly 32 years.
Here’s how Harrison Smith in The Washington Post described her: “The daughter of a blacksmith in a Kentucky coal mine, Rep. Slaughter traced her lineage to Daniel Boone and attacked her political opponents with a marksman’s accuracy and, not infrequently, a disarming grin.”

She was a microbiologist who moved to New York State with her husband in the 1950s. A local fight over a stand of beech-maple trees drew her to elected office, serving in county and state legislatures and then Congress. Slaughter was the first woman to chair the powerful House Rules Committee. She co-sponsored the 1994 Violence against Women Act, defended the right to choose, fought to get the Senate to hear Anita Hill’s testimony against Clarence Thomas’ nomination to the Supreme Court, co-chaired the Congressional Arts Caucus and wrote the STOCK Act to bar members of Congress from insider trading.

I was proud to be her friend. Louise Slaughter and I sat next to each other at a dinner in Rochester, NY, eight years ago and bonded over politics and a shared love for the song lyrics of Johnny Mercer. We would talk on the phone from time to time and the day she died I found a recent voicemail in which she cheerfully chatted about being up to her neck in work and pushing back against the unending Republican attempts to kill Obamacare, a bill she had helped advance through the House.

Both Louise Slaughter and Bobby Kennedy represented New York State on Capitol Hill but their concern was for the whole nation. They shared a commitment to compassion, fairness and equal rights that transcended payoffs, privilege and bullying egos. They recognized that country and citizenship should come first and that elections are supposed to be about being chosen to speak for the best interests of the people.

There’s speculation that the latest Trump rant was set off by special counsel Mueller’s subpoena of Trump corporate records and an initial list of questions he has submitted for the president to answer. They doubtless are just the beginning of queries intended to determine whether our chief executive has obstructed justice or colluded with Russia in election tampering, whether he chose profit and self-interest over patriotism and loyalty.

Compare Trump to Kennedy and Slaughter and it makes you want to weep. And then pray.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License

Michael Winship, senior writing fellow at Demos and president of the Writers Guild of America-East, was senior writer for Moyers & Company and Bill Moyers’ Journal and is senior writer of BillMoyers.com.

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Trump Admits He Killed Soleimani Because of Impeachment

Polipace Staff

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Not that it comes as a surprise, but Donald Trump is admitting to his comrades that he killed Iranian General Soleimani because he felt pressure from GOP colleagues that would decide his impeachment trial.

The administration has made a slapdash case for why it chose to assassinate Soleimani, but the main arguments have been that he was planning to attack Americans within days, and that the US would always respond forcefully after US citizens were killed. In December, an Iranian-backed militia killed an American contractor in Iraq.

But the Wall Street Journal on Thursday night included an eye-popping tidbit in its story about how Trump came to green-light the Soleimani operation: “Mr. Trump, after the strike, told associates he was under pressure to deal with Gen. Soleimani from GOP senators he views as important supporters in his coming impeachment trial in the Senate, associates said.”

In a lengthy piece detailing how the president’s top advisers coalesced behind the strike on Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the Journal noted that Trump said he felt “under pressure” to satisfy senators who were pushing for stronger US action against Soleimani and who will run defense for him on impeachment.

One of Trump’s most outspoken supporters, GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham was reportedly the only congressional lawmaker Trump briefed about his plan to assassinate Soleimani in the days leading up to the strike. 

In other words, the president felt the need to shore up support from some unnamed Republican lawmakers ahead of his imminent Senate impeachment trial.

It’s important to note that the above passage is just a short paragraph in a much longer piece about the inner workings of the Trump administration’s Soleimani discussions. And so far there is no other evidence to suggest that Trump didn’t give the order mainly to deter Iran from threatening Americans, although it’s unclear just how “imminent” that threat truly was.

But if Trump did consider impeachment when opting to kill the Iranian general — even if for a moment — then this is quite the scandal. It would mean the president didn’t just have the interests of the nation or the world in mind when bringing the US and Iran to the brink of war, but also his own personal political interests.

More reporting is needed to see just how much impeachment weighed on Trump’s mind when he gave the order. At a minimum, though, the Wall Street Journal’s reporting calls into question the legality of Trump’s Soleimani strike and the true intention behind it. And at worst, Trump’s decision to kill a foreign leader — as much as he may have deserved his fate — partly for political gain, is arguably impeachable on its own.

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What Drugs Are Donald Trump Taking and How Do They Affect Him?

Polipace Staff

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New questions about Trump’s mental and physical health have been coming up lately in the mainstream news. Donald Trump isn’t known for having the healthiest eating habits. While we might not know everything about his health, his physician Dr. Harold N. Bornstein has revealed enough to guess how healthy the president might — or might not — really be.

From heart attack prevention pills to hair growth meds, these are the drugs Trump depends on daily — and what they might tell us about his health.

The problem with these drugs is that three of them have serious side effects on the brain: including creating confusion, memory loss and even issues with rage and anger.

1. Rosuvastatin for high cholesterol
As its name implies, the drug Rosuvastatin belongs to a specific class of medications called statins, which lower total and LDL blood cholesterol. It’s likely Trump takes this medication to reduce his cholesterol and prevent possible complications that might result from living with high cholesterol levels in his blood because of his addiction to fast food, including eating McDonalds almost daily. Side effects may include constipation, headache, nausea, stomach pain, weakness, Selenium and Coenzyme Q deficiency and muscle aches and pains. Other side effects may include memory loss or confusion, kidney or liver problems or very rarely a deadly breakdown of muscle.

2. An antibiotic for rosacea
Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Some antibiotics (including tetracyclines) have both anti-inflammatory and antibiotic capacities. Low doses are normally used to provide more of an anti-inflammatory effect than an antibiotic (antibacterial) effect. Maximum anti-inflammatory effects appear to be achieved with doxycycline 40 mg capsules once daily. Tetracyclines (doxycycline and minocycline) have been the mainstay of treatment since the 1950s. Side effects of antibiotics may include vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, bloating and indigestion, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. Some antibiotics may cause dysfunction in the kidney and result in mineral imbalances. It may be necessary to monitor mineral levels if antibiotic therapy is prescribed long term.

3. Aspirin
Aspirin (81 mg) is widely used to reduce heart attack risk. But how does it work? Simply, aspirin interferes with the body’s blood-clotting action. It reduces the clumping action of platelets (blood-clotting cells), thus preventing a heart attack. Aspirin may cause minor side effects. Side effects may include acid or sour stomach, anxiety, belching, dizziness, dry mouth, hyperventilation, irritability, shaking, stomach discomfort, trouble sleeping, unusual drowsiness, tiredness, weakness or feeling sluggish.

4. Propecia is used for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. The condition is characterized by thinning of the hair on the scalp, which results in a receding hairline and/or balding on top of the head. The medication prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the body. DHT may be responsible for the shrinking of the hair follicle and may inhibit a hormone called IGF-1 that helps with hair growth.

Side effects of Propecia may include hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat. The drug may also cause breast lumps, pain, nipple discharge and other breast changes, which may be signs of male breast cancer. Other side effects may include depression, impotence, loss of interest in sex, trouble having an orgasm, abnormal ejaculation, syncope, dizziness, weakness and headache.

Should note that he used to, and may still, be taking amphetamines, according to this report.

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Are Stimulant Drugs Messing Up Trump’s Mind and Speech? Doctor Claims He’s on Drugs

Polipace Staff

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I got a weird phone call after the Trump speech ended announcing the US Embasy Moving to Jerusalem, from a Psychiatrist in New York, who claimed that Donald Trump was taking Adderall and other psycho-stimulants. He didn’t want to have his name used, but he checked out as a Psychiatrist who had been working in Manhattan for over 20 years. He  said that Trump had been taking all types of stimulants for years and it was one of the reasons that Trump was, according to him, suffering from Dementia, as it causes permanent brain damage.

He also claims this is why Trump slurred, “God Blesshh the United Shtakes” in his speech.

Well, according to the doctor, he was a “friend of” one of the Doctors who prescribed drugs to Donald Trump until he started to run for President.

This isn’t the first time someone had made this accusation. According to SpyMagazine “Have you ever wondered why Donald Trump has acted so erratically at times, full of manic energy, paranoid, garrulous? Well, he was a patient of Dr. [Joseph] Greenberg’s from 1982 to 1985.”

Trump Drug Prescription 1982

Dr. Joseph Greenberg treated Trump from 1982 to 1985 for “metabolic imbalances‚” which is not a real medical disorder‚ but rather a fancy way of saying Trump wanted to burn fat.

The thing about Tenuate Dospan is that‚ due to its side effects‚ which include insomnia‚ confusion‚ and nervousness‚ it’s only supposed to be used for short time periods. So this makes what was written about Trump’s use of the drug seem alarming.

The diet drugs‚ which he took in pill form‚ not only curbed his appetite but gave him a feeling of euphoria and unlimited energy. The medical literature warned that some potentially dangerous side effects could result from long-term usage; they included anxiety‚ insomnia‚ and delusions of grandeur. According to several Trump Organization insiders‚ Donald exhibited all these ominous symptoms of diet drug abuse‚ and then some.

The brain damage caused by amphetamine use is still noticeable years later, say many experts.

In fact, users undergo similar brain chemical changes to patients suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease, stroke or brain tumors.

The Doctor said that it was “obvious” that Trump has been popping speed of some sort, and this would explain his weird speech patterns, and even the “crashes” he seems to have where he starts slurring his words suddenly and has severe dry mouth.

When you watch Trump speak to a crowd, and pay attention to his mannerisms and speech patterns, he certainly fits the bill for what you would expect from someone who is consuming pharmaceuticals.

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