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Why Did Trump Declare Himself a “Nationalist” and Why It’s So Dangerous

Polipace Staff

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Trump declaring himself a Nationalist isn’t a surprise to those who have studied his past inclinations to white nationalism and racial theories. The right wing will tell you that “nationalist” just means that he’s patriotic, but for most of us – we know that’s total and absolute bull***t.  He didn’t declare himself a nationalist for any other reason to get the white nationalist agenda pushed during the midterms.

He didn’t just say he was a “Nationalist” but also said he was against Globalism – a term that is often used to refer to a “Jewish Global Conspiracy.” This isn’t new: it’s the Steve Bannon terms that are being pushed by the President, and they don’t exist in a vacuum.

Stephen Bannon, the former chief strategist for President Donald Trump, reportedly applied the epithet to Kushner, saying he was nothing more than a “globalist.”

“Globalist” is one of Bannon’s favorite insults, and he uses it in opposition to “nationalist,” the outlook he claims to represent.

“They’re corporatist, globalist media that are adamantly opposed to an economic nationalist agenda like Donald Trump has,” he complained in an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference a few years ago.

So what does it mean he’s a nationalist then?

George Orwell wrote best in his Notes on Nationalism, what Nationalism really means: Nationalism is not to be confused with patriotism…By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.

Lets make this clear, Nationalism is not the same as patriotism. While patriotism is a bit more of a vague word to describe the love and devotion to a country, its ideals and values, nationalism is more the promotion of a nation’s culture, language, and supremacy above others. In this sense, nationalism is often race or ethnicity-driven, which can have dangerous implications.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, “Adherents of white nationalist groups believe that white identity should be the organizing principle of the countries that make up Western civilization. White nationalists advocate for policies to reverse changing demographics and the loss of an absolute, white majority. Ending non-white immigration, both legal and illegal, is an urgent priority — frequently elevated over other racist projects, such as ending multiculturalism and miscegenation — for white nationalists seeking to preserve white, racial hegemony.”

Patriotism on the other hand can be seen in things like the singing of the national anthem at a World Cup soccer game, the decorations on a table for the 4th of July, or the dedication service men and women show through their heroism. It is far less ideologically destructive than nationalism and doesn’t necessitate the same devotions.

Some on Twitter noted links between nationalism and fascism.

Trump’s brand of nationalism was criticized in January by Paul Miller, a national security professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

Writing for Foreign Policy magazine, Miller picked apart Trump’s nationalism, focusing heavily on his claim that “the nation-state remains the best vehicle for elevating the human condition.”

Trump didn’t call himself “Patriotic” on purpose — he used the word Nationalist, because he knew his core crowd of white men would understand it perfectly: he means WHITE NATIONALIST.

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Trump

BREAKING: Jupiter Sex Trafficking Madame Attended White House Meetings On Behalf of Trump

Polipace Staff

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New photos taken from notorious Jupiter Madame, Li “Cindy” Yang is a businesswoman and entrepreneur originally from China. One of those spas was the Orchids of Asia Day Spa, where Patriots owner Robert Kraft got a hand job from a sex slave.

Yang claims she sold the spa years ago, and she has not been charged in connection with Kraft’s arrest yet, but questions about her chain of sex spas has raised a lot of questions — especially when photos were found of her attending confidential White House meetings on Behalf of President Trump.

Additionally experts have noted that often the illegal spas “trade hands” in order to keep tax authorities off guard and hide assets.

Of course, this raises some significant questions about their relationship, and how someone who is connected with sex-trafficking of illegal immigrants, had such access on behalf of the President of the United States.

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Meet Donald Trump’s Sex Trafficker

Polipace Staff

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The Miami Herald has published a story this morning with the headline Trump cheered Kraft’s team to Super Bowl victory with founder of spa where he was busted, and there’s certainly a lot to unpack.

It seems that she had unprecedented access to the President up to her arrest, and a personal relationship with Trump.

It features a picture of the president with Li Yang at his Super Bowl LIII Mar-a-Lago watch party. Yang, who emigrated from China, started a chain of day spas in South Florida which, according to the article, have been known to be brothels for some time.

One of those was Orchids of Asia Day Spa, where New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft allegedly visited, leading to an arrest for solicitation of prostitution.

Since the 2016 election cycle began, Yang has been a fixture at Republican political events, contributing around $58,000 to Trump-related committees. She was invited to the White House for an Asian-American and Pacific Islander Initiative event last year, the Herald reports.

According to insiders, people questioned why a known pimp was invited to the White House, but Trump overrode any security concerns by the Secret Service.

Trump and Kraft have a longstanding friendship. The president addressed last month’s scandal.

“Well, it’s very sad,” he said. “I was very surprised to see it. He’s proclaimed his innocence totally, but I’m very surprised to see it.”

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Meet Trump’s Pro-Dwarf Tossing Judge

Polipace Staff

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Donald Trump has nominated Neomi Rao to replace Brett Kavanaugh on the Court of Appeals in the DC Circuit. The announcement prompted a notable spike in online talk about dwarf-tossing—that’s right, the practice of throwing little people like a shot-put.

Dwarf-tossing has been banned in some US states and parts of France for offending human dignity, and a Nov. 16 post on Mother Jones by Stephanie Mencimer called Rao a “staunch defender” of this pastime: “Rao considers these laws an affront to individual liberty that fails to recognize the right of the dwarf to be tossed,” Mencimer writes.

Rao, currently administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, wrote about the controversial “sport” repeatedly while she was a professor at George Mason University law school. Her writings offer “a pretty good indication of where [Rao] will come down as a judge, not just on dwarf-tossing bans, but on some of the nation’s most contentious issues,” including same-sex marriage, says Mencimer. By reading Rao on dwarf-tossing, we can predict that she will be preoccupied with “all the conservative bugaboos.”

Conservative and liberal commentators seem to agree that Rao’s dwarf-tossing arguments illuminate her worldview and judicial philosophy. But not everyone agrees on whether Rao’s position is defensible or being genuinely represented by the press. For example, R Street Institute policy fellow Shoshana Weissmann in Reason on Nov. 26 noted, “If you only read about Rao’s work in Mother Jones…you might have thought that Rao simply has a niche affinity for dwarf tossing.”

In pieces reviewed by BuzzFeed News that Rao wrote between 1994 and 1996 — she graduated from Yale University in 1995 — she described race as a “hot, money-making issue,” affirmative action as the “anointed dragon of liberal excess,” welfare as being “for the indigent and lazy,” and LGBT issues as part of “trendy” political movements. On date rape, Rao wrote that if a woman “drinks to the point where she can no longer choose, well, getting to that point was part of her choice.”

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